The Ever Flattering 1950s Princess Style Dress

If  you fancy 50s fit and flared dresses , then, if you haven’t already, you need to find yourself a princess style version.   This silhouette is one of my favorites to come out of that era.  A princess line dress doesn’t have a waist seam.  The way it forms to the body is through the cutting and sewing of vertical panels, each one designed to be narrower on top and  widen toward the bottom to give the dress it’s fitted bodice and full skirt shape.  The vertical seaming draws the eye down, so creates a very slimming look.

Nowadays you don’t see many dresses in stores constructed this way. The most obvious reason would be the amount of fabric and labor it takes to cut and sew a pattern design made up of so many pieces.  The more seams, the more it costs to make the dress.  You do sometimes see this silhouette in bridal wear, though.

I only have rudimentary sewing skills, so when I look at a 1950s princess style dress with many panels, it never ceases to amaze me  how all those separate pattern pieces come together so perfectly!  If I had to sew it up, I’m sure the dress would be unrecognizable when I got done with it!

Below  are some examples of 1950s figure flattering princess line dresses.

This dress was made from Vogue Pattern 8234- The yummy color is called “orange ice.” And I love that starburst pin!
From a 1954 Glamour Magazine.

1954 Princess style dress from Vogue pattern 8234

1954 Princess style dress from Vogue pattern 8234. Frances McLaughlin photo

Princess style black and white check coatdress by Leslie Fay.
1954 Glamour Magazine.

Leslie Fay black white check princess dress. 1954- Frances McLaughlin photo

Leslie Fay black white check princess dress. 1954- Frances McLaughlin photo

Campus Casuals Schiffli embroidered dresses. Glamour 1954.
The one on the left is interesting, as it has no defined waist seam on the front panel, but the sides show dropped waist seams.
The one on the right has an empire waist seam so the panels begin just below the bust.

Campus Casuals 1950s princess line dresses-Glamour Magazine 1954

Campus Casuals 1950s princess style dresses-Glamour Magazine 1954

This 1950s  Simplicity Pattern from Etsy Seller Crafty Paneen is a lovely example of the princess silhouette.

 1950s Simplicity pattern for  princess dress

1950s Simplicity pattern for princess dress

And check out this lovely 1950s ice blue damask princess style dress that we just added to our website.
It has eight separate panels, plus long vertical darts, to create its flattering  fit and flared shape.

1950s blue damask princess style dress

1950s blue damask princess style dress

Have a glamorous day!

 

 

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4 thoughts on “The Ever Flattering 1950s Princess Style Dress

  1. Completely agree, Jessica. Would be a great style for a garden wedding. And I just realized I’ve got a few more of these princess style dresses to get on the site for spring/summer season. Though I am sorely tempted to keep a couple for myself!

  2. Oh wow, now that is just stunning. I love the classic elegance and sweepingly beautiful glamour at work here. I think that dress would honestly be perfect for a more causal wedding (for the bride I mean), say something at city hall or in a really relaxed outdoor springtime setting.

    ♥ Jessica

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