Tag Archive | vintage fashion magazine

Designer Summer Fashions-June 1956

Take a look at these exquisite dresses from my June 1956 Vogue Magazine.  Part of  the spring/summer collections of  legendary designers Christian Dior, Jacques Fath and Mainbocher.

This first dress is a design by Christian Dior, noted for his introduction of the “New Look” back in 1947.  That fiited bodice/full skirt silhouette was still a popular style in 1956 and remains a classic look till this day.   That same year  Ava Gardner had him design 14 dresses for her character, Lady Susan Ashlow, in  the film  “The Little Hut” and  his romantic floral fragrance, Diorissimo, was launched.

From the article “Paris dresses-summer printings, in silks that are thin and delicious, and as welcome in June as strawberries. Dramatically cool new day-look under a big white hat. Dior’s palette knife print that’s a mingle of many clear reds- the cut, two piece and quite covered.”

Dior summer collection June 1956

Red silk dress, Dior summer collection June 1956 Vogue Magazine

Jacques Fath, a self taught designer, was a key figure in the revival of the post World War 11 Paris fashion industry.  His creations appealed to a young, very sophisticated international clientele. He dressed many Hollywood stars, including Ava Gardner, Greta Garbo, and Rita Hayworth, who wore one of his dresses when she married Prince Aly Khan.  Unfortunately the extremely talented Fath died of  leukemia in 1954. But his wife, Genevieve, kept the House of Fath operational for a couple more years with the help of his associates who had previously worked for other famous designers, including Chanel, Pioret, Balmain, Schiaparelli and Patou.  With talent like that behind them,  it’s no surprise that this dress from the House of Fath’s 1956 spring/summer collection is so gorgeous!

BTW, the stunning backgrounds for both of these photos are Monet’s Nympheas(Water Lilly paintings)  at  the Musee de L’Orangerie, Paris.

“Silk chiffon print from Fath-a botany lesson on the most delicate herbs. It also illustrates a pretty new look for little summer dinners in town, softness wrapped very close, with the fresh surprise of white linen at the far flung neckline.”

Fath summer collection 1956 Vogue Magazine

Silk Chiffon Dress-Fath summer collection June 1956 Vogue Magazine

Main Rousseau Bocher, aka Mainbocher, a Chicago born designer who originally was the editor in chief of  Vogue Magazine in Paris before embarking on his illustrious career in fashion design.  He was the only American to ever successfully operate a couture house in Paris.  He  relocated his business  to New York in 1940 where he continued creating  luxurious haute couture dresses and gowns for the world’s most famous women, including the Wallis Simpson’s (Duchess of Windsor) wedding dress.  Society ladies, actresses and royalty coveted the timeless, understated elegance of his designs.  He considered himself the “Rolls Royce of the Fashion Trade”.

From the Vogue article- American Summer Glamour-The Mainbocher Look.   “Casual summer perfection by Mainbocher in silk and cashmere, a delicious example of coolness and ease combined with a fine sense of formality-and news. The dress, a bright blur of soft silk flowers, uses a cardigan sweater as luxurioulsy as if it were a sable jacket.”

Mainbocher silk dress June 1956 Vogue Magazine

Mainbocher silk dress June 1956 Vogue Magazine

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Charm Magazine April 1947-Continued

In my previous post about Charm,  I mentioned it was a magazine that catered to working girls and it was the first of its kind.   Three very talented women, Estelle Rubenstein, as promotion director, Helen Valentine, editor,  and Cipe Pinelles, art director, launched Charm Magazine because they realized there was no other publication at that time that spoke to the increasing numbers of women entering the workforce.

According to this article covering  Estelle Rubenstein’s career in publishing, she was quite the marketing genius.  Her worked has actually been archived by the Smithsonian Institute’s Center for Advertising History.

Below are more ads from the April 47 issue of Charm for merchandise in a style and price range that would appeal to this growing demographic.

This ad for “Pirate Earrings” by Coro states they are “lovely loot for your ears.” They’re all priced from 2.00-3.00 a pair.

"Pirate Earrings" by Coro

"Pirate Earrings" by Coro

Here’s an ad for some rhinestone studded gun jewelry. Perfect accessory for the pistol packing “Girl Friday”.

The chatelaine was $5.00. Matching earrings $2.00.

"Gun Play" costume jewelry by Dor-Ard

"Gun Play" costume jewelry by Dor-Ard

After a long, stressful week at the office fending off advances from the boss, while being paid about half of what a man earned,  a working girl could relax on the weekend in one of these adorable playsuits with matching overskirt for only $12.00.

Striped playsuit with front button skirt by Lampl

Striped playsuit with front button skirt by Lampl

And last, but not least, the shoes.

These fabulous spectators were available in white suede with either brown, red, green or blue calfskin.  I would have to have a pair in every color!

"Frenchies" spectator pumps.

"Frenchies" spectator pumps.

This ad for “American Girl” shoes states of their customer, “she has a job, a home and community life”

"American Girl" shoes-1947

"American Girl" shoes-1947

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Holiday Evening Gowns-1950

Below are some photos of glamorous holiday evening gowns from a fashion spread in the December 1951 issue of Ladie’s Home Journal.  What I wouldn’t give to have a closet full of these!

The accompanying text for the article was written by Wilhela Cushman,who was fashion editor of the Journal for 25 years.

“Time to be feminine, to look the way men like to see you-in a drift of tulle, in lacy cotton over taffeta, in a column of satin with a trailing panel. Your shoulders are bare, your waistline bracelet-size, your skirts ruffled and puffed, fan pleated, side draped. You’ll wear opal colors-especially mauve, violet and blue. Your slippers will be jewel colored velvet and you’ll twine rhinestones or pearls round your arms and in your hair.”

Did you catch the part about the “bracelet sized waist”?  Now you know why so many dresses from that era have such small waistlines.  The hourglass shape was the height of fashion,  and women laced themselves into corsets and waistcinchers to create that extremely curvy look.

First up is a frothy pink confection by Ceil Chapman.  Reminds me of cotton candy!  And how about that silver Christmas tree with the pink roses on it? Swoon!

Pink ruffled tulle gown by Ceil Chapman

Pink ruffled tulle gown by Ceil Chapman

This next festive frock is an emerald green satin column gown with floating panel by Wilson Folmar.   Dresses with his label are sought after among savvy vintage clothing collectors.  He designed very stylish, higher end cocktail and evening wear.

Emerald green satin gown by Wilson Folmar.

Emerald green satin gown by Wilson Folmar.

Another smashing gown by Ceil Chapman in embroidered organdy over taffeta, accompanied by a gold taffeta coat.

ceil-chapman-2

Organdy dress with taffeta coat by Ceil Chapman.

This violet beauty is a Mark Mooring creation. He was a designer for Bergdorf Goodman and also a Coty Fashion Critics Award winner.

Dresses with his label are scarcer than hen’s teeth. So if you ever run across one, consider it the equivalent of hitting the lottery!

Violet taffeta gown by Mark Mooring.

Violet taffeta gown by Mark Mooring.

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In Vogue November 1963-Makeup and Hairstyles

My fourth and last post on fashion trends shown in Vogue Magazine, November 1963, highlights hair and makeup.

In the photo below you can see that the eyes have it! The focus was on a heavily lined cat eye, framed by long dark lashes. Blue, green and purple eyeshadows were also very popular.   Of course, the darker the eye, the paler the lipcolor, so as not to look overly made up.   If you care to try it, you can refer to my previous post for creating the cat eye look. It’s quite the sexy, dramatic look for evening.

Makeup trends in 1963

Makeup trends in 1963

When most people think of hairstyles from the 60s, the flip and the beehive are the first two that come to mind.  But if you look below, you’ll see there were other popular hairdos, all very sleek and sculptural.   In the 60s there is no doubt rollers and hair lacquer were two very important items in the fashionable woman’s beauty arsenal, as were wigs and falls, which allowed for the creation of some very elaborate updos.  Since the November 1963 Vogue focuses on fashions for the holiday season, many of the hairstyles are shown on models wearing evening dresses. Notice the  glittery  jewelled accents in the hair.  Tres chic!

Hairstyles for evening-November Vogue 1963

Hairstyles for evening-November Vogue 1963

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